The 1920´s female body ideal


The 1920’s began with the disappearance of the female silhouette altogether ! Womenswear became more mannish, waist was gone, bust was gone, shoulders were broader and hair much shorter. The silhouette emphasised a flat chest and any womanly curves were eliminated as the line became more simplified. The infamous Symington Side Lacer became briefly popular, and certainly was a godsend to the lesbian community.In effect, this was a bra that could be laced at both sides and in to flatten a womans chest. The aim was to look boyish. Corsets gave way to Latex girdles and cami-bockers - directoire knickers with a chemise - among young women during the Roaring Twenties.One could hardly party in boned corsetry, unless you were courting a visit to the local hospital !

The 1920’s began with the disappearance of the female silhouette altogether ! Womenswear became more mannish, waist was gone, bust was gone, shoulders were broader and hair much shorter. The silhouette emphasised a flat chest and any womanly curves were eliminated as the line became more simplified. The infamous Symington Side Lacer became briefly popular, and certainly was a godsend to the lesbian community.In effect, this was a bra that could be laced at both sides and in to flatten a womans chest. The aim was to look boyish. Corsets gave way to Latex girdles and cami-bockers – directoire knickers with a chemise – among young women during the Roaring Twenties.
One could hardly party in boned corsetry, unless you were courting a visit to the local hospital !

 “Flapper” in the 1920s was a term applied to a “new breed” of young Western women who wore short skirts, bobbedtheir hair, listened to jazz, and flaunted their disdain for what was then considered acceptable behavior. Flappers were seen as brash for wearing excessive makeup, drinking, treating sex in a casual manner, smoking, driving automobilesand otherwise flouting social and sexual norms. Flappers had their origins in the period of liberalism, social and political turbulence and increased transatlantic cultural exchange that followed the end of the First World War, as well as the export of American jazz culture to Europe. Actress Louise Brooks (1927)A flapper onboard ship (1929)

 

Flapper” in the 1920s was a term applied to a “new breed” of

 

 

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