The earth is not rotating – spinning – or moving !!


I’m posting this video here, but I’m not really expecting you to watch it.  I think that the title of the video is enough to cause enough seriously damaging facepalms.  The contents is pretty much what you’d expect.  Evidence from the Bible, combined with horrifically moronic science and a lot of random shit that will make you go wtf?

Sometimes, you just have to share the fail.

Paradoxical enough, if one takes Left Hand Path to mean basically the same as the Tantric “Vamachara”, the most LHP i could do would be ritual incorporating the 4 Gospels and authors, “Our Father” and Christian prayer.


Some fucking introspection?


As soon as something as horrible as the Oslo bombing and Utöya shooting happens, it is like everybody starts surfing it to further their pet ideologies.

People saying things like “vote right wing parties with nationalistic ideas out” (the feeling of being “silenced” is exactly one of the things that creates McVeighs and Breiviks).

Nationalists will ofcourse claim that the purp was feeling desperate and cornered and felt he had no other option, but that they cant condone his actions (exactly the same argument as Islamist terrorists would use).

I for one emidiatly thought “Islam”.
The fact that i have lived in a country where terrorists where red headed and military was patrolling the streets at bank deliveries (i almost shat myself. If i would have sneezed i would be full of holes now) didnt make a difference.

The fact that i´m aware of Japanese terrorists that where neither Muslims nor Christians didnt make a difference either.

Grant it, Islamic terrorism is over represented in the world FOR NOW.

So here we are, looking at each other.
Seeking that scape goat.

Furthering our ideolical agendas.

PEOPLE ARE DEAD, FOR REAL,AS IN ” DO NO LONGER EXIST”!

Maybe we should be looking at ouselves?
Maybe some fucking introspection?

Timeless Taboo: New Attacks on African Spirituality


 

 

by Ezinne Adibe

Atlanta Post

On January 13, 2010 Pat Robertson, founder and chairman of the Christian Broadcasting Network,  stated that Haiti “swore a pact to the devil.”  This was one day after a 7.0 earthquake rocked the island nation resulting in massive loss of life. The “pact” Robertson so confidently mentioned to various media outlets was a reference to the Haitian Revolution, more specifically, the Bwa Kayiman (Bois Caiman) Ceremony in August of 1791.

The event is significant because Africans of varying ethnicities joined together in a traditional ceremony to affirm that they would no longer remain enslaved.  The insurrection in Saint-Domingue (modern Haiti), in what would become known as the Haitian Revolution, resulted in the establishment of a Haitian republic in 1804.  The “devil” Robertson spoke of was a reference to the African gods invoked by Haitians to overthrow their French oppressors.

This practice of referring to anything in the realm of African spirituality as evil or devilish is a continuation of the propaganda used by missionaries, slave traders, and colonizers ever since they ventured onto the continent.  Enslaved Africans were treated as a people without culture.  They were reduced to being treated as cargo.  Africans were viewed as heathens because they had their own religious traditions prior to the introduction of Christianity and Islam.  These traditions include ancestor veneration, systems of initiation and respect for the natural environment.

African Traditions in the Americas

African spiritual systems, which fall under the category of African Traditional Religion (ATR), are the traditions that have sustained us since time immemorial.  Enslaved Africans brought these traditions to such places as Haiti, Brazil, Cuba, New Orleans, Florida, and South Carolina. They can be seen in the burial custom of placing items on the graves of deceased family members, knowledge of certain ritualistic and medicinal practices, known under various names as juju, hoodoo, rootwork, etc.  They can be seen in the tradition of adorning trees with bottles, vessels, and other objects to protect the household through invocation of the dead as noted in places like Mississippi, South Carolina, and Virginia.

Yet another church pamphlet


I think EVERY religion should knock on doors and spread pamphlets until this gets prohibited for Christians (since they dont get “no”).

We should ALL, including “The Church of Satan,” insist that everyone join us, agree with us and reshape their entire culture acording to our ways.

Imagine me knocking at someones door asking if they have heard the good news of Thor?

Basically every indigenous culture on earth is already replaced by this Roman religion and they have been at their ethno emperialism for 2000 years now.

Has somebody MISSED their message somehow???

Polytheism


When i search for polytheism on Tumblr i get a whole lot of not so educated Abrahamic “monotheistic” bullshit, rewriting history and explaining what is wrong with it.

Too bad.

1. To refer to polythistic religions as primitive is not only bigotry but outright stupid.

These are customs and cultures that in many cases where around in one form or another for thousands of years before two guys invented Christianity in Rome (and no, neither was named Jesus and only one of them even met him).

2.Abrahamic “monotheists” (i only consider certain forms of Islam as truly monotheistic. Christianity is a text book case of soft polytheism….just like most forms of Hinduism) like to spell God with a capital “G” when its a monotheistic God, and with a “g” when its a polytheistic God. That says a lot.

3.Romantic shrines to pagan Gods, supposedly Germanic, built in Victorian times or during the nazi romanticism are NOT part of any culture, Germanic or otherwise.

Well. Now there is a post by a polytheist, about polytheism tagged “Polytheism”

Thomas Di Leva – Everyone Is Jesus


HAPPY EASTER!

*Ps:For you that are not Swedish, he didnt dress up for the video, he ALWAYS dresses like that*

-An exeptionally good Bhakti Yogic / Gnostic / Christian mantra-

Everyone is Jesus everyone
Is Jesus everyone
Is Jesus everyone

Everyone is Jesus everyone
Is Jesus everyone
Is Jesus everyone

Every girl and boy is Jesus
Every tree and sea is God
Every word You speak is holy
Every flame is Jesus love

Everyone is Jesus everyone
Is Jesus everyone
Is Jesus everyone

Everyone is Jesus everyone
Is Jesus everyone
Is Jesus everyone

Put your heart in your mind
And your mind in your heart
Put your heart in your mind
And your mind in your heart
Put your heart in your mind
And your mind in your heart

Say:
Ba ba bababa um baba um ba um baba um ba ba ba um
Ba ba bababa um baba um ba um baba um ba ba ba um
Say:
Ba ba bababa um baba um ba um baba um ba ba ba um
Ba ba bababa um baba um ba um baba um ba ba ba um

Every flame is Jesus love

Everyone is Jesus everyone
Is Jesus everyone
Is Jesus everyone

Everyone is Jesus everyone
Is Jesus everyone
Is Jesus everyone

Everyone is Jesus everyone
Is Jesus everyone
Is Jesus everyone

More lyrics: http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/d/di_leva_thomas/#share

Småland [Province of Smolandia],Sweden


Map
The provinces of Sweden withSmåland highlighted
Coat of Arms
Land Götaland
Maincorresponding county Kronoberg County
Kalmar County
Jönköping County
Indigenous dialect(s) Småländska
Population 720,358[1]
Area 29,400 km²
Flower Twinflower
Animal Otter

 Småland  is a historical province (landskap) in southern Sweden. Småland borders BlekingeScania or Skåne,HallandVästergötlandÖstergötland and the island Öland in the Baltic Sea. The name Småland literally means Small Lands. The latinized form Smolandia has been used in other languages. The highest summit in Småland is Tomtabackenwith its 377 m.

Historical cities

Towns with former city status were: Eksjö (chartered around 1400), Gränna (1652), Huskvarna (1911), Jönköping (1284), Kalmar (approximately 1100), Ljungby (1936), Nybro (1932), Nässjö (1914), Oskarshamn (1856), Sävsjö (1947), Tranås (1919), Vetlanda (1920), Vimmerby(approximately 1400), Värnamo (1920), Västervik (approximately 1200), Växjö (1342)

History

The area was probably populated in the Stone Age from the south, by people moving along the coast up to Kalmar. Småland was populated by Stone Age peoples by at least 6000 BC, since the Alby People are known to have crossed the ice bridge across the Kalmar Strait at that time.

Migration period, Smolandian tumulus (grave mound)

The name Småland (“small lands”) comes from the fact that it was a combination of several independent lands, Kinda (today a part of Östergötland), Tveta, Vista, Vedbo, Tjust, Sevede, Aspeland, Handbörd, MöreVärendFinnveden and Njudung. Every small land had its own law in the Viking age and early middle age and could declare themselves neutral in wars Sweden was involved in, at least if the King had no army present at the parliamentary debate. Around 1350, under the king Magnus Eriksson a national law was introduced in Sweden, and the historic provinces lost much of their old independence.

The city of Kalmar is one of the oldest cities of Sweden, and was in the medieval age the southernmost and the third largest city in Sweden, when it was a center for export of iron, which, in many cases, was handled by German merchants.

Nils Dacke.18th century painting

Småland was the center of several peasant rebellions, the most successful of which was Dackefejden led by Nils Dacke in 1542–1543. When officials of king Gustav Vasa were assaulted and murdered, the king sent small expeditions to pacify the area, but all failed. Dacke was in reality the ruler of large parts of Småland during the winter, though heavily troubled by a blockade of supplies, before finally being defeated by larger forces attacking from both Västergötland and Östergötland. Dacke held a famous battle defence at the (now ruined)Kronoberg Castle, and was shot while trying to escape to then Danish-ruled Blekinge.

Traditional Windsor chairs perhaps made in Småland

In the 19th century, Småland was characterized by poverty, and had a substantial emigration to North America, which additionally hampered its development. The majority of emigrants ended up in Minnesota, with a geography resembling Sweden, combining arable land with forest and lakes.

Max Von Sydow and Liv Ullman from the film "The Emigrants" (novel by V.Moberg)

File:Skurugata.jpg
An image from a canyon in the forested Småland.

Religion

In comparison with much of Sweden, Småland has a higher level of religious intensity and church participation (Lutheran).

Smalandians

In the 20th century, Småland has been known for its high level of entrepreneurship and low unemployment, especially in the Gnosjöregion. Some suggest the harsh conditions have throughout history forced the inhabitants of the region to be cunning, inventive and cooperative.

This is how the old Swedish encyclopedia Nordisk familjebok described the people:

the Smalandian is by nature awake and smart, diligent and hard-working, yet compliant, cunning and crafty, which gives him the advantage of being able to move through life with little means. 
A running joke, or stereotype, in Sweden, is that of the Smalandian being very economical, or even cheap. Ingvar Kamprad said that the Smalandian are seen as the Scotsmen of Sweden.

Language

The local language is a Swedish dialect known as Småländska (Smalandian). This may in turn be separated in two main branches, with the northern related to the Götaland dialects and the southern to the Scanian dialects.

Heraldry

The first coat of arms for Småland, granted in 1560 pictured a red crossbow with roses on a golden shield but at the coronation ofJohan III in 1569 a new coat of arms was granted. A lion was wielding the crossbow and the roses had fallen off. There was also a revision in 1944, but no alterations were made. Småland is also considered a duchy and has the right to carry a ducal coronet with the arms.

Blazon: “Or a lion rampant Gules langued and armed Azure holding in front paws a Crossbow of the second bowed and stringed Sable with a bolt Argent.”


Stave Churches ( With Pictures)


Borgund Stave Church (Bokmål: Borgund stavkirke, Nynorsk: Borgund stavkyrkje) is a stave church located in Borgund, Lærdal,Norway. It is classified as a triple nave stave church of the so-called Sogn-type. This is also the best preserved of Norway’s 28 extant stave churches.
Borgund was built sometime between AD 1180 and 1250 with later additions and restorations. Its walls are formed by vertical wooden boards, or staves, hence the name stave church. The 4 corner posts were connected to one another by ground sills, resting atop a stone foundation.1 The rest of the staves then rise from the ground sills, each stave notched and grooved along the sides so that they lock into one another, forming a sturdy wall.2

Borgund Stave Church (BokmålBorgund stavkirkeNynorskBorgund stavkyrkje) is a stave church located in BorgundLærdal,Norway. It is classified as a triple nave stave church of the so-called Sogn-type. This is also the best preserved of Norway’s 28 extant stave churches.

Borgund was built sometime between AD 1180 and 1250 with later additions and restorations. Its walls are formed by vertical wooden boards, or staves, hence the name stave church. The 4 corner posts were connected to one another by ground sills, resting atop a stone foundation.1 The rest of the staves then rise from the ground sills, each stave notched and grooved along the sides so that they lock into one another, forming a sturdy wall.2

Roof detail of stave church

Roof detail of stave church

Door detail from Hededalen stave church, Valdres, Norway

Door detail from Hededalen stave church, Valdres, Norway


Fantoft Stave Church (Norwegian: Fantoft stavkirke) is a reconstructed stave church in the Fana borough of the city of Bergen, Norway.
The church was originally built in Fortun in Sogn, a village near inner or eastern end of Sognefjord around the year 1150. In the 19th century the church was threatened by demolition, as were hundreds of other stave churches in Norway. The church was bought by consul Fredrik Georg Gade and saved by moving it in pieces to Fantoft near (now in) Bergen in 1883.

Fantoft Stave Church (NorwegianFantoft stavkirke) is a reconstructed stave church in the Fana borough of the city of BergenNorway.

The church was originally built in Fortun in Sogn, a village near inner or eastern end of Sognefjord around the year 1150. In the 19th century the church was threatened by demolition, as were hundreds of other stave churches in Norway. The church was bought by consul Fredrik Georg Gade and saved by moving it in pieces to Fantoft near (now in) Bergen in 1883.


Heddal stave church (Heddal stavkirke) is a stave church located at Heddal in Notodden municipality, Norway.
The church is a triple nave stave church and is Norway’s largest stave church. It was constructed at the beginning of the 13th century. After the reformation the church was in a very poor condition, and a restoration took place during 1849 - 1851. However, because those who did it didn’t have the necessary knowledge and skills, yet another restoration was necessary in the 1950’s. The interior is marked by the period after the Lutheran Reformation in 1536/1537 and is for a great part a result of the restoration that took place in the 1950’s.

What is known is that five peasants together with Sira Eilif built the church

Heddal stave church (Heddal stavkirke) is a stave church located at Heddal in Notodden municipality, Norway.

The church is a triple nave stave church and is Norway’s largest stave church. It was constructed at the beginning of the 13th century. After the reformation the church was in a very poor condition, and a restoration took place during 1849 – 1851. However, because those who did it didn’t have the necessary knowledge and skills, yet another restoration was necessary in the 1950’s. The interior is marked by the period after the Lutheran Reformation in 1536/1537 and is for a great part a result of the restoration that took place in the 1950’s.

What is known is that five peasants together with Sira Eilif built the church

Stave Churches


Beginning in the eleventh century and continuing for several centuries wooden stave churches were constructed in Norway.

By the thirteenth century there were more than a thousand stave churches.

In the middle of the fourteenth century the plague came to Norway and much of the country was left unpopulated.

The farm my family came from about 50 miles from Trondheim was not resettled until the 1600’s. 

Still the Grip church was built as late as the 15th century, and the Hedared church in Sweden dates as late as 1500.

Today only around 30 remain. In 1992 the Fortun or Fantoft church near Bergen was the victim of arson.

Several of the churches have been moved, re-erected and preserved at new locations.

 The Gol church was moved and reconstructed at Bygdoy at the National Folk Museum.

Parts of others are also stored there. There is a stave church in Hedared, Sweden

and one in Greensted, Essex in England. The old Vang stave church from Valdres Valley, Norway was sold to

the King of Prussia, Fredrik Wilhelm IV, who moved it to Karkonosze (Mountains) in Karpacz Górny

(now Polish territory) and rebuilt it there.

There are replicas of the Borgund church at Rapid City, South Dakota

and at seven-eights scale at Washington Island, Wisconsin.

The replicas at the Epcot Center, Disney World, Florida and Hallingdal, Buskerud, Norway, are of the Gol church,

and a copy of the reconstruction has been built in Gol.

There is a replica of the Hopperstad church at Morehead, Minnesota. And a replica of the Haltdalen church was built in 2001 on Heimwæy, one of the Vest-manna Islands, on the site of Iceland’s first church, built by Olav Trygvasson.

The Haltdalen church was placed in the Sverresborg Museum in Trondheim in 1882-1883.

There are also plans to build a replica of the stave church in Haltdalen.

The stave construction method uses vertical posts that rest on a foundation as the

main support structure, rather than a horizontal planks or beams laid upon a foundation (as in a log cabin, for example).

The site was usually a high, open area which was conspicuous and prominent, places which bore

“the special imprint of God the creator.” These locations were often on a peninsula, overlooking a fjord,

or at the bend in a river.

The ground at the site was leveled-out and the first wooden beams were laid out in a rectangular pattern atop a stone foundation.

Next, the staves (or vertical posts) were erected.

Cross-braces were then constructed between the posts.

Bent wooden arches were also added to most churches between the staves for enhanced stability and decoration.

Finally, carvings, paintings, and other ornamentation were added to both the interior and exterior of the churches.

Stave churches were made entirely of wood except for ironwork detailing like door locks or hinges.

The wood used was specially cut and dried to prevent cracking.

The only tools used in the construction of the stave churches were axes, augers, primitive planes,

and various knives and chisels.

The planks and pieces of wood were dovetailed,

pegged, and wedged so each joint could expand or contract with the  temperature and humidity, which varied greatly from season to season in Norway.

Of the churches that remain, 3 churches, and carvings, paintings, and tapestries from others

have appeared on Norwegian stamps.

Urness ~ ca. 1150

     The church in Urnes was built around 1050, and is generally agreed to be the oldest stave church.

The church was declared a “World Cultural Heritage” in 1979 by the United Nations.

According to the WCH, “The church brings together traces of Celtic art, Viking traditions

and Romanesque spatial structures.”

SCN 1120

     The Urnes stave church in Sogn, built in the second half of the twelfth century, contains a 100 year older church doorway.

A four-legged animal beset by dragons is the main motif on the jambs.

On the curved upper part dragons engage in battle. Serpents and dragons entwine in writhing figures-of-eight, forming the basic element in the impressive and delicately executed composition, with its roots in Viking art.

SCN 526

Borgund ~ ca 1150

     The Borgund stave church is the best preserved of the Norwegian stave churches – it stands more or less as it was

when it was built in 1150.

SCN 185

SCN 728

Heddal ~ ca. 1250

     The oldest part of Heddal stave church, the chancel, was probably built in 1147.

This was quite a small church, and only 95 years later the church was enlarged to the present size.

It is the largest stave church in existence.

SCN 727

Ål Church ~ late 1200’s

     The Ål church was pulled down in the 1880’s, and a new church was built on the site.

The timber vaulting above the chancel, complete with painted decorations dating from the later part of the 1200’s,

were acquired by the University Museum of Antiquities in Oslo.

SCN 665; Annunciation

   SCN 666 Visitation                                               

SCN 667

Nativity  

   

SCN 668

                                                         Adoration

                                                   

Baldishol Tapestry ~ 12th Century

     Two months, April and May, of the Baldishol Tapestry, from the twelfth century have been preserved,

and are now in The Oslo Museum of Applied Art.

The section which has been preserved measures 118 by 203 centimeters. It is made out of wool from the Norwegian sheep,spellsau. In some places flax has been used.

The yarn, which was dyed with vegetable dye, is red, yellow, green, or one of many shades of blue.

The fragment depicts an eleventh or twelfth century knight similar to those of the Bayeux Tapestry. Although the tapestry was discovered in an 18th century church, it is believed that it was originally hung in a stave church.

SCN 687

SCN 685

SCN 686

Skodvinar Church of Hemsedal ~ ca. 1207

  

Skodvinar Church of Hemsedal ~ ca. 1207

     The Skodvinar church was built between 1207 and 1224.

It was a triple-nave church, with eight staves supporting the central nave. There were no seats except for a bench on the outer walls.

Everyone, except the old, sick, or handicapped stood. Also, by law, everyone over the age of twelve, except the sick, had to attend the services under penalty of law.

When the church was torn down in 1882, the two portals were preserved in the Museum of Antiquities in  Oslo.

The carving on the stamp is from the west portal and represents one of the Three Holy Kings who came to worship the Christ Child.

The stamp was issued in 1972 to mark the 1,100th anniversary of unification of Norway by Harald Haarfager in 872.

His descendents ruled Norway until the death of Haakon V in 1319.

SCN 587

Hylestad Church of Setesdal ~ 13th Century

     The Hylestad stave church was pulled down in the 19th century, and one of its portals is now exhibited at the University Museum of Antiquities in Oslo.

The carving on the portal shows several scenes from the legend of Sigurd Fåvnesbane.

Sigurd and Regin, a master swordsmith forged a sword with which Sigurd killed the dragon, Fafnir.

When Sigurd tasted the broth from Fafnir’s heart he was able to understand the language of birds who reveled that Regin planned to betray Sigurd. Sigurd then killed Regin and took Fafnir’s treasure.

Sigurd married Gudrun whose brothers Gunnar, Hogni, and Guttorm killed Sigurd and took the treasure.

Gunnar sunk the treasure in the Rhine. Gudrun married Atli (Attila, the Hun), who threw Gunnar into a snake-pit in

a vain effort to induce him to reveal the location of the treasure. The design on the stamp shows

Sigurd and Regin forging the sword.

SCN 669

     I would like to thank David M. Walsten (rutoscdav@yahoo.com) for his help in preparing this page.

For further details I refer you to his 1994 book, Stave Churches of the World, An Introduction.

Source: http://sio.midco.net/danstopicalstamps/stavechurch.htm