Lambetta Scooters


I have noticed many Vespa and Lambretta scooters on ebay that are absolutely perfect. These scooters are 30 or more years old and they look like they just came off the assembly line, maybe even better than that. When you look at the location of those scooters, many say Vietnam, something which may put off some buyers but if you look a little closer, it gets very interesting.

It turns out, there is a booming scooter restoration business in southeast Asia. With a huge amount of raw material in the form of tired and used scooters and access to brand new replacement parts, manufactured, most likely, in China, these little operations transform the old scooters into brand new 30 year old Vespa and Lambretta scooters.

The Knee Slider: http://thekneeslider.com/archives/2006/08/06/repair-and-restoration-vespa-scooters/

Chris Gilmour. A cardbord life-size replica of a Lambretta scooter, include an overdose of lights. Masterful!

It was not unusual for Mods to customize (almost wrote modify) their scooters a wee bit. Puttin´a few lamps on like so. One want to avoid accidents an´all one does.

Thank to the following vict…sources:

http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/post-war/16994-lambretta-scooter-lovers-here-14.html

http://cratedig.blogspot.com/2006_06_01_archive.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/culturepicturegalleries/6661402/Cardboard-sculptures-Chris-Gilmour-creates-art-out-of-corrugated-cardboard-boxes.html?image=3

http://9teen87spostcards.blogspot.com/2009/07/lambretta-150-cc-scooter.html

Heathen idols and cult objects


Mjollnir (Danish type)

A silver charm in the form of Thor's hammer, Mjollnir, crafted in Uppland, Sweden, during the 10th century. The hammer was named after the thunderbolt with which Thor defended the gods from their enemies, and the ornamentation incorporates a pair of staring eyes. 10th century


Drinking horn. Can (but doesent have to) be used for libations in blot and in Symbel


Key(s). Important as a symbol (as well as ...well,key) for the female authority of the homestead and lands (when the man was away authority did NOT pass to some brother or eldest son but to the wife. Women where often buried with their keys as an object of authority, power and status).Modern Thor Altar

Anglo / Saxon Fyrn Sidy Altar

Mjollnir By Casper Art

Weapons. Free men (the karls) we expected to bear arms (there where no military or police to turn to). It should be said that an axe or a knife constituded a weapon then as now. Men where buried with weapons.

Freya with cats (Modern)

Silver hoard, Gotland,Sweden Iron Age

Hammer and Oath Ring. The ring is held during the swearing of oaths.

The Norse people where always a boating people (notice that i´m not saying longship, you dont need them for fishing) Gudvangen, Norway (by scott photos)

Horses has always been important for Germanic peoples.


Tartan in sub cultures


TARTAN TROUSERS

The designs are current but a reflection on the past ‘skinhead’ subculture stlye which give it a retro look. The trousers are made from tartan.

Black Tartan Clan. Celtic Punk

Fred Perry MaacQueen Tartan Shirt.

This shirt would actually fit Skinheads,Punks or Rockabillies equally well.

Punk RED Tartan/Plaid...Punk RED Tartan/Plaid…

eBay: Find Punk RED Tartan/Plaid cigarette PANTS THERMAL LEGGING…

 First Added by neverhood

Punk Tartan/Plaid...

I have been known to wear something similar, though mine had a black and white tartan and was originally equipped with a “kilt”.

I always used to wear a pairl like these, though black and white tartan.

Stave Churches ( With Pictures)


Borgund Stave Church (Bokmål: Borgund stavkirke, Nynorsk: Borgund stavkyrkje) is a stave church located in Borgund, Lærdal,Norway. It is classified as a triple nave stave church of the so-called Sogn-type. This is also the best preserved of Norway’s 28 extant stave churches.
Borgund was built sometime between AD 1180 and 1250 with later additions and restorations. Its walls are formed by vertical wooden boards, or staves, hence the name stave church. The 4 corner posts were connected to one another by ground sills, resting atop a stone foundation.1 The rest of the staves then rise from the ground sills, each stave notched and grooved along the sides so that they lock into one another, forming a sturdy wall.2

Borgund Stave Church (BokmålBorgund stavkirkeNynorskBorgund stavkyrkje) is a stave church located in BorgundLærdal,Norway. It is classified as a triple nave stave church of the so-called Sogn-type. This is also the best preserved of Norway’s 28 extant stave churches.

Borgund was built sometime between AD 1180 and 1250 with later additions and restorations. Its walls are formed by vertical wooden boards, or staves, hence the name stave church. The 4 corner posts were connected to one another by ground sills, resting atop a stone foundation.1 The rest of the staves then rise from the ground sills, each stave notched and grooved along the sides so that they lock into one another, forming a sturdy wall.2

Roof detail of stave church

Roof detail of stave church

Door detail from Hededalen stave church, Valdres, Norway

Door detail from Hededalen stave church, Valdres, Norway


Fantoft Stave Church (Norwegian: Fantoft stavkirke) is a reconstructed stave church in the Fana borough of the city of Bergen, Norway.
The church was originally built in Fortun in Sogn, a village near inner or eastern end of Sognefjord around the year 1150. In the 19th century the church was threatened by demolition, as were hundreds of other stave churches in Norway. The church was bought by consul Fredrik Georg Gade and saved by moving it in pieces to Fantoft near (now in) Bergen in 1883.

Fantoft Stave Church (NorwegianFantoft stavkirke) is a reconstructed stave church in the Fana borough of the city of BergenNorway.

The church was originally built in Fortun in Sogn, a village near inner or eastern end of Sognefjord around the year 1150. In the 19th century the church was threatened by demolition, as were hundreds of other stave churches in Norway. The church was bought by consul Fredrik Georg Gade and saved by moving it in pieces to Fantoft near (now in) Bergen in 1883.


Heddal stave church (Heddal stavkirke) is a stave church located at Heddal in Notodden municipality, Norway.
The church is a triple nave stave church and is Norway’s largest stave church. It was constructed at the beginning of the 13th century. After the reformation the church was in a very poor condition, and a restoration took place during 1849 - 1851. However, because those who did it didn’t have the necessary knowledge and skills, yet another restoration was necessary in the 1950’s. The interior is marked by the period after the Lutheran Reformation in 1536/1537 and is for a great part a result of the restoration that took place in the 1950’s.

What is known is that five peasants together with Sira Eilif built the church

Heddal stave church (Heddal stavkirke) is a stave church located at Heddal in Notodden municipality, Norway.

The church is a triple nave stave church and is Norway’s largest stave church. It was constructed at the beginning of the 13th century. After the reformation the church was in a very poor condition, and a restoration took place during 1849 – 1851. However, because those who did it didn’t have the necessary knowledge and skills, yet another restoration was necessary in the 1950’s. The interior is marked by the period after the Lutheran Reformation in 1536/1537 and is for a great part a result of the restoration that took place in the 1950’s.

What is known is that five peasants together with Sira Eilif built the church

Stave Churches


Beginning in the eleventh century and continuing for several centuries wooden stave churches were constructed in Norway.

By the thirteenth century there were more than a thousand stave churches.

In the middle of the fourteenth century the plague came to Norway and much of the country was left unpopulated.

The farm my family came from about 50 miles from Trondheim was not resettled until the 1600’s. 

Still the Grip church was built as late as the 15th century, and the Hedared church in Sweden dates as late as 1500.

Today only around 30 remain. In 1992 the Fortun or Fantoft church near Bergen was the victim of arson.

Several of the churches have been moved, re-erected and preserved at new locations.

 The Gol church was moved and reconstructed at Bygdoy at the National Folk Museum.

Parts of others are also stored there. There is a stave church in Hedared, Sweden

and one in Greensted, Essex in England. The old Vang stave church from Valdres Valley, Norway was sold to

the King of Prussia, Fredrik Wilhelm IV, who moved it to Karkonosze (Mountains) in Karpacz Górny

(now Polish territory) and rebuilt it there.

There are replicas of the Borgund church at Rapid City, South Dakota

and at seven-eights scale at Washington Island, Wisconsin.

The replicas at the Epcot Center, Disney World, Florida and Hallingdal, Buskerud, Norway, are of the Gol church,

and a copy of the reconstruction has been built in Gol.

There is a replica of the Hopperstad church at Morehead, Minnesota. And a replica of the Haltdalen church was built in 2001 on Heimwæy, one of the Vest-manna Islands, on the site of Iceland’s first church, built by Olav Trygvasson.

The Haltdalen church was placed in the Sverresborg Museum in Trondheim in 1882-1883.

There are also plans to build a replica of the stave church in Haltdalen.

The stave construction method uses vertical posts that rest on a foundation as the

main support structure, rather than a horizontal planks or beams laid upon a foundation (as in a log cabin, for example).

The site was usually a high, open area which was conspicuous and prominent, places which bore

“the special imprint of God the creator.” These locations were often on a peninsula, overlooking a fjord,

or at the bend in a river.

The ground at the site was leveled-out and the first wooden beams were laid out in a rectangular pattern atop a stone foundation.

Next, the staves (or vertical posts) were erected.

Cross-braces were then constructed between the posts.

Bent wooden arches were also added to most churches between the staves for enhanced stability and decoration.

Finally, carvings, paintings, and other ornamentation were added to both the interior and exterior of the churches.

Stave churches were made entirely of wood except for ironwork detailing like door locks or hinges.

The wood used was specially cut and dried to prevent cracking.

The only tools used in the construction of the stave churches were axes, augers, primitive planes,

and various knives and chisels.

The planks and pieces of wood were dovetailed,

pegged, and wedged so each joint could expand or contract with the  temperature and humidity, which varied greatly from season to season in Norway.

Of the churches that remain, 3 churches, and carvings, paintings, and tapestries from others

have appeared on Norwegian stamps.

Urness ~ ca. 1150

     The church in Urnes was built around 1050, and is generally agreed to be the oldest stave church.

The church was declared a “World Cultural Heritage” in 1979 by the United Nations.

According to the WCH, “The church brings together traces of Celtic art, Viking traditions

and Romanesque spatial structures.”

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     The Urnes stave church in Sogn, built in the second half of the twelfth century, contains a 100 year older church doorway.

A four-legged animal beset by dragons is the main motif on the jambs.

On the curved upper part dragons engage in battle. Serpents and dragons entwine in writhing figures-of-eight, forming the basic element in the impressive and delicately executed composition, with its roots in Viking art.

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Borgund ~ ca 1150

     The Borgund stave church is the best preserved of the Norwegian stave churches – it stands more or less as it was

when it was built in 1150.

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Heddal ~ ca. 1250

     The oldest part of Heddal stave church, the chancel, was probably built in 1147.

This was quite a small church, and only 95 years later the church was enlarged to the present size.

It is the largest stave church in existence.

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Ål Church ~ late 1200’s

     The Ål church was pulled down in the 1880’s, and a new church was built on the site.

The timber vaulting above the chancel, complete with painted decorations dating from the later part of the 1200’s,

were acquired by the University Museum of Antiquities in Oslo.

SCN 665; Annunciation

   SCN 666 Visitation                                               

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Nativity  

   

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                                                         Adoration

                                                   

Baldishol Tapestry ~ 12th Century

     Two months, April and May, of the Baldishol Tapestry, from the twelfth century have been preserved,

and are now in The Oslo Museum of Applied Art.

The section which has been preserved measures 118 by 203 centimeters. It is made out of wool from the Norwegian sheep,spellsau. In some places flax has been used.

The yarn, which was dyed with vegetable dye, is red, yellow, green, or one of many shades of blue.

The fragment depicts an eleventh or twelfth century knight similar to those of the Bayeux Tapestry. Although the tapestry was discovered in an 18th century church, it is believed that it was originally hung in a stave church.

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Skodvinar Church of Hemsedal ~ ca. 1207

  

Skodvinar Church of Hemsedal ~ ca. 1207

     The Skodvinar church was built between 1207 and 1224.

It was a triple-nave church, with eight staves supporting the central nave. There were no seats except for a bench on the outer walls.

Everyone, except the old, sick, or handicapped stood. Also, by law, everyone over the age of twelve, except the sick, had to attend the services under penalty of law.

When the church was torn down in 1882, the two portals were preserved in the Museum of Antiquities in  Oslo.

The carving on the stamp is from the west portal and represents one of the Three Holy Kings who came to worship the Christ Child.

The stamp was issued in 1972 to mark the 1,100th anniversary of unification of Norway by Harald Haarfager in 872.

His descendents ruled Norway until the death of Haakon V in 1319.

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Hylestad Church of Setesdal ~ 13th Century

     The Hylestad stave church was pulled down in the 19th century, and one of its portals is now exhibited at the University Museum of Antiquities in Oslo.

The carving on the portal shows several scenes from the legend of Sigurd Fåvnesbane.

Sigurd and Regin, a master swordsmith forged a sword with which Sigurd killed the dragon, Fafnir.

When Sigurd tasted the broth from Fafnir’s heart he was able to understand the language of birds who reveled that Regin planned to betray Sigurd. Sigurd then killed Regin and took Fafnir’s treasure.

Sigurd married Gudrun whose brothers Gunnar, Hogni, and Guttorm killed Sigurd and took the treasure.

Gunnar sunk the treasure in the Rhine. Gudrun married Atli (Attila, the Hun), who threw Gunnar into a snake-pit in

a vain effort to induce him to reveal the location of the treasure. The design on the stamp shows

Sigurd and Regin forging the sword.

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     I would like to thank David M. Walsten (rutoscdav@yahoo.com) for his help in preparing this page.

For further details I refer you to his 1994 book, Stave Churches of the World, An Introduction.

Source: http://sio.midco.net/danstopicalstamps/stavechurch.htm

Swedish Summer Cottage…


Swedish Summer Cottage…

A little bit of sunshine certainly improves my mood. The sun is shining today here in Kentucky, but my mind is with this amazingly beautiful summer cottage in Sweden.Just look at that light! I also love the dry stacked stone console.

Nothing like a cottage that dares to be eclectic.
_____
images via oko design blog
POSTED BY JAMES SNOWDEN