Lesism – by Les Floyd


 

 

Saturday, 1 January 2011

The Futility of Regret

The psychological debris from the past which burdens the majority of us through our lives is nothing but an illusion of our minds.

Deep-seated anger, guilt, regret, prejudice, the inability to forgive – whether that be yourself or others – and every other issue that muddies what otherwise would be a clear mind is simply not real.

These things don’t exist outside your thoughts.

An absolute truth is that the past can never be fixed, just as you can’t, right now, fix a car that is sitting on a driveway in 1987 – not even if you hire a quantum mechanic.

So why worry?
The present moment – the only place you will ever experience true life – is a place you can let go of your anger, release yourself of your guilt, open your eyes to how foolish your judgement and prejudice was, and forgive.

Let it all fall away and live your life, right now.

Me?


I know every thing about the future.

It was yesterday.

Whoever is walking around in my skin isnt me.

I was thinking of not writing here when i was in a dark mood but, hey, my blog = my crap.

I dont expect anyone to read anything they dont find remotely interesting.

So, for the third time i take the medieval carriage they call train here, into Jönköping.

Yet again to no avail.

Yet again someone, far more successful than me for some reason that must be among the greater cosmic mysteries, behaves like a retard and the whole poop land at my lap.

Perhaps i should form my own little gang of people with dwarfed lives:

Grumpy.

Pissy.

Fooley.

Farmy.

Snorty.

Simply .

And me, Left behindy.

Dreams and hopes are not only far away for me, they arent at all. I am in some phantom zone dream state outside of time and space, and life goes on without me….somewhere else.

I´m no longer sure it would make a difference if i moved.

I´m no longer me anyway.

Just someone pretending to be be me but not quite making it.

Animal Cruelty – China


leisure-:  jasmine-blu:     In China, live animals such as turtles and fishes are sealed inside plastic pouches to be used as keychains. Exposed to harsh dyes, the animals soon suffocate and die. This is 100% legal and becoming increasingly popular. REBLOG to spread the word and put a stop to this cruel practice.

leisure-:

jasmine-blu:

In China, live animals such as turtles and fishes are sealed inside plastic pouches to be used as keychains. Exposed to harsh dyes, the animals soon suffocate and die. This is 100% legal and becoming increasingly popular. REBLOG to spread the word and put a stop to this cruel practice.

 

Viking Age Life


Viking Life

At home in Scandinavia, the Vikings lived in small settlements of farmers and traders. Most were farmers that grew crops, raised farm animals, fished, and hunted. The main crops farmed were barley, rye, oats, peas, beans, and cabbage. They also had cattle, pigs, sheep, geese, chickens, and goats which were used for meat, milk, eggs, wool, and leather. Every part of them was used, with no waste. A large number of animals were slaughtered before winter and the meat preserved by salting or smoking. This was to prevent them from eating valuable stored food during the winter months.

The landscape of Scandinavia is rather varied. Norway is more mountainous, while Sweden is flatter with farmland and forests, and Denmark is doted with hundreds of small islands.

Most Vikings lived in longhouses. These large, one roomed houses were made of wood and had an earth floor. They were rectangular in shape, with the length being much longer than the width. A large example would be 50 meters long by 5 meters wide. Members of the immediate family and often other relatives would live here. The living quarters of the house had a hearth in the middle to provide heat, light, and cooking facilities. There was no chimney and the smoke escaped through a hole in the roof. The walls would be lined with broad benches that doubled as beds, and there would also be a table and a few stools and chests.
Longhouse from Norstead Viking Farm


Viking Longhouse pictures from Glomesdal Viking Age Reenactment Group

Women were very important in Viking life. Since the men were often gone for long periods of time the women ran the home. The wife would raise the children, look after the farm, conduct family business affairs, and tend domestic chores.

For entertainment the Vikings liked to play games. They played a board game called hneftafl which was a form of checkers. During the summer months they played outdoor ball games, and also challenged each other to wrestling and swimming matches. Story telling was another favorite form of entertainment. Storytellers were called Skalds, and they would recount great tales of adventures, heros, and gods. Skalds were always in demand for feasts and at the courts of chieftains.

The Dalai Lama


THE DALAI LAMA, WHEN ASKED WHAT SURPRISED HIM MOST ABOUT HUMANITY, HE SAID:

 

 

 

“Man.

Because he sacrifices his health in order to make money.

Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health.

And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present;

the result being that he does not live in the present or the future;

he lives as if he is never going to die, and then dies having never really lived.”

 

Viking Age – Farm and village


  Print In the middle of the world was a farm. The farm itself. The farmhouse and its land was in the center both in the daily reality and in people’s worldview. At the core of the house was warmth, and friends. In the open countryside around it was farmland, other farms and villages. But around it were large forests or oceans, and here the world ended for most people.  Reconstruction of a Viking house from 1000’s of High, Sweden. Living on a farm means to monitor the animals and the arable annual timetables.Ploughing, sowing, harvesting. The animals were to and from work. You have to store up food and feed for the winter. It was on the farm most of Viking life was lived. The farm in the middle The Norse mythology tells us that humans and gods lived in Middle Earth. It means “courtyard in the middle”. Middle Earth was in the mythology of the civilized world, and rather an urban landscape - a community - than an isolated farm. Outside Middle-earth was unknown land of monsters such as giants. Worldview and Rural This world is easily understandable by the light of the settlement pattern looked like in Scandinavia. There were many small agricultural regions (Middle Earth) which was separated by large undeveloped areas, often deep forests. The farm lands and most of all the farm itself was at the center is not surprising because this is where life was lived. Farm and village Farms could be alone or in villages. In densely populated major agricultural areas of the villages seems to have been the most common, while lonely farms was probably typical of the more sparsely populated areas. Farms appearance, construction method, and how many houses of different varieties they covered ranged from different areas. The most common was that it was a bit bigger houses surrounded by a few small houses. The house in Bjärred In a small village in Bjärred in western Skåne was in the 800s a house. It was 21 meters long and 6.5 meters wide. That means a living area of 136.5 square feet and does not seem so bad for a large family of perhaps 70-10 people. But the house would probably also hold some cattle. Even if you had a proper demarcation of stable part so you could not get out of animal smells and sounds. The frame of the house were two rows of sparsely covered large wooden posts. On these pillars rested the roof’s weight. A large number of wall poles had been knocked down on the takbärande poles. Between the wall poles intertwined branches which are then underlined with clay and perhaps fertilizer. So you had to own walls. In some places the walls were built entirely of wood or of stone and earth. The roof was a branch works as being covered with straw or reeds. In the middle of the house was the hearth and that was its main point. From there came light, heat, and it was here the food was cooked. Viking ceramic vessels from Köpingsvik,Köpings parish, Öland.Inventarienr: 25840:59:3:51. The furniture in a Viking houses were few. Along the walls were probably low benches. On the floor there were maybe some rough chairs, tables and benches. Coffins and baskets couldused for storage. Of course there were a lot of little things as tools, pots, ceramic cooking and storage, textiles of various kinds, wooden barrels to eat at. Textile equipment of various kinds shows that crafts such as spinning wool and weaving was done indoors. Grophus Outside the house in Bjärred was one yard. Here was a small house that’s been around a house. There was also a very small house, the floor lowered into the ground. Such houses, or rather earth huts, called grophus and is often circular with a diameter of like that two to three meters. Pit houses seem mostly to have been used for crafts. Many have been found in textile equipment. Some were tanks. Excavated by Many Viking houses and parts of the farms have been excavated by archaeologists. In Denmark, the whole village unearthed. The most famous was at Vorbasse in Jutland.From here you can get an impression of how a large Viking agricultural village looked like. Livestock and crops Wooden plows from Tibble, Björnlunda parish,Södermanland.Inventarienr 26022ndThe common was that they were involved in both livestock and agriculture. Pigs, cattle and sheep were ordinary domestic animals on farms. Plows were not, but the most important tool was årdret and it was used to loosen the soil, topsoil down the seed, remove weeds and break up the stubble after harvest. Årdret a traction tool that could be drawn by one or two oxen, cows, horses or people. Ardres was reinforced with iron in the lead - a årderbill. For reaping and mowing had scythes and sickles.

 

Print

In the middle of the world was a farm. The farm itself. The farmhouse and its land was in the center both in the daily reality and in people’s worldview. At the core of the house was warmth, and friends. In the open countryside around it was farmland, other farms and villages. But around it were large forests or oceans, and here the world ended for most people.

Husrekonstruktion
Reconstruction of a Viking house from 1000’s of High, Sweden.

Living on a farm means to monitor the animals and the arable annual timetables.Ploughing, sowing, harvesting. The animals were to and from work. You have to store up food and feed for the winter. It was on the farm most of Viking life was lived.

The farm in the middle

The Norse mythology tells us that humans and gods lived in Middle Earth. It means “courtyard in the middle”. Middle Earth was in the mythology of the civilized world, and rather an urban landscape – a community – than an isolated farm. Outside Middle-earth was unknown land of monsters such as giants.

Worldview and Rural

This world is easily understandable by the light of the settlement pattern looked like in Scandinavia. There were many small agricultural regions (Middle Earth) which was separated by large undeveloped areas, often deep forests. The farm lands and most of all the farm itself was at the center is not surprising because this is where life was lived.

Farm and village

Farms could be alone or in villages. In densely populated major agricultural areas of the villages seems to have been the most common, while lonely farms was probably typical of the more sparsely populated areas. Farms appearance, construction method, and how many houses of different varieties they covered ranged from different areas. The most common was that it was a bit bigger houses surrounded by a few small houses.

The house in Bjärred

In a small village in Bjärred in western Skåne was in the 800s a house. It was 21 meters long and 6.5 meters wide. That means a living area of 136.5 square feet and does not seem so bad for a large family of perhaps 70-10 people. But the house would probably also hold some cattle. Even if you had a proper demarcation of stable part so you could not get out of animal smells and sounds.

The frame of the house were two rows of sparsely covered large wooden posts. On these pillars rested the roof’s weight. A large number of wall poles had been knocked down on the takbärande poles. Between the wall poles intertwined branches which are then underlined with clay and perhaps fertilizer. So you had to own walls. In some places the walls were built entirely of wood or of stone and earth. The roof was a branch works as being covered with straw or reeds. In the middle of the house was the hearth and that was its main point. From there came light, heat, and it was here the food was cooked.

CROCK
Viking ceramic vessels from Köpingsvik,
Köpings parish, Öland.
Inventarienr: 25840:59:3:51.

The furniture in a Viking houses were few. Along the walls were probably low benches. On the floor there were maybe some rough chairs, tables and benches. Coffins and baskets couldused for storage. Of course there were a lot of little things as tools, pots, ceramic cooking and storage, textiles of various kinds, wooden barrels to eat at. Textile equipment of various kinds shows that crafts such as spinning wool and weaving was done indoors.

Grophus

Outside the house in Bjärred was one yard. Here was a small house that’s been around a house. There was also a very small house, the floor lowered into the ground. Such houses, or rather earth huts, called grophus and is often circular with a diameter of like that two to three meters. Pit houses seem mostly to have been used for crafts. Many have been found in textile equipment. Some were tanks.

Excavated by

Many Viking houses and parts of the farms have been excavated by archaeologists. In Denmark, the whole village unearthed. The most famous was at Vorbasse in Jutland.From here you can get an impression of how a large Viking agricultural village looked like.

Livestock and crops

Wooden plows
Wooden plows from Tibble, Björnlunda parish,
Södermanland.Inventarienr 26022ndThe common was that they were involved in both livestock and agriculture. Pigs, cattle and sheep were ordinary domestic animals on farms. Plows were not, but the most important tool was årdret and it was used to loosen the soil, topsoil down the seed, remove weeds and break up the stubble after harvest. Årdret a traction tool that could be drawn by one or two oxen, cows, horses or people. Ardres was reinforced with iron in the lead – a årderbill. For reaping and mowing had scythes and sickles.

 


 Everyday Life in the Iron Age What was Life like in the Iron Age?  In the Iron Age they used a plough called an “ard”. Extra large picture. More illustrations. © Niels BachPloughing with an ard. Big picture© Lejre Experimental Centre Almost everybody in the Iron Age was involved in farm work and that goes for women and children, too. In order to prepare the land people used a special kind of plough, an ard, which was pulled by a couple of oxen. That was probably the men’s part of the work. Very few people were actual artisans. The most important of the artisans was probably the blacksmith and next to him were the people who did the peat-digging. They were important because the peat was used for melting out bog iron. The women were very skilled at making earthenware vessels. The earthenware vessels were used in connection with cooking and for trading. It took a long time to grindthe grains to make flour.Big picture The women also took care of the food and made sure there was enough laid up for the cold winters. They milked the cows, made bread and cheese and dried meat and fish. A lot of time was spent on harvesting the fields - the grain had to be threshed first, after which the kernels were grinded to flour on a stone grinder. In a mortar - a big stone with a round hole - they grinded seeds and nuts to small bits, so they could be used for porridge and bread. The leader of the community held a position which entitled him to not participate in the daily work of taking care of the land and the livestock. He had to train the men for war and make sure that the laws of the tribe were observed as well as be a kind of minister in the village. The women had many children during their childbearing years but only few of the children survived. Out of a family of 10 brothers and sisters only two or three children lived to have children of their own. Most people died before they had turned 45. Even at the time of the Tollund Man they digged peat in the bog. Extra large picture. More illustrations.© Niels BachThe goats needed to be milked. Big picture© Lejre Experimental Centre The boys and girls had to watch the livestock and help around the house which included fetching firewood for the fireplaces. The children of the Iron Age played like all children but we don’t know much about the games they played. In a grave which held the body of a young child, Silkeborg Museum discovered a rattle made of clay. Games which made use of dice and a board with glass pieces were also very popular. We don’t know how much time the children spent on playing. It is very likely that as soon as they were old enough they were put to work - tending the livestock, picking berries, cleaning the stable, spreading manure on the fields and collecting firewood. The day wasn’t divided into work and fun - the two were mixed together. Girl wearing a dress from the Iron Age.Big picture © Lejre Experimental Centre People got up when the sun rose and the cock crowed. They probably started the day by feeding the livestock. The manure that had accumulated over night had to be gathered and spread on the fields. In the wintertime some of the livestock, sheep and pigs would be in the stable right next to where the people ate and slept. In the summertime most of the residents’ lives were probably spent outdoors. In the evening the livestock would be shooed inside the fence surrounding the village after which it was closed. As the sun was setting people would gather around the fireplace and listen to stories before going to bed. People slept on low plank beds around the fireplace and the sound of the livestock munching would mix with the residents’ snoring.

 

Everyday Life in the Iron Age

What was Life like in the Iron Age?

 

Click for extra large pictureIn the Iron Age they used a plough called an “ard”. Extra large pictureMore illustrations. © Niels BachPloughing with an ardPloughing with an ard. Big picture
© Lejre Experimental Centre

Almost everybody in the Iron Age was involved in farm work and that goes for women and children, too. In order to prepare the land people used a special kind of plough, an ard, which was pulled by a couple of oxen. That was probably the men’s part of the work.

Very few people were actual artisans. The most important of the artisans was probably the blacksmith and next to him were the people who did the peat-digging. They were important because the peat was used for melting out bog iron.

The women were very skilled at making earthenware vessels. The earthenware vessels were used in connection with cooking and for trading.

It took a long time to grind the grains to make flourIt took a long time to grind
the grains to make flour.
Big picture

The women also took care of the food and made sure there was enough laid up for the cold winters. They milked the cows, made bread and cheese and dried meat and fish.

A lot of time was spent on harvesting the fields – the grain had to be threshed first, after which the kernels were grinded to flour on a stone grinder. In a mortar – a big stone with a round hole – they grinded seeds and nuts to small bits, so they could be used for porridge and bread.

The leader of the community held a position which entitled him to not participate in the daily work of taking care of the land and the livestock. He had to train the men for war and make sure that the laws of the tribe were observed as well as be a kind of minister in the village.

The women had many children during their childbearing years but only few of the children survived. Out of a family of 10 brothers and sisters only two or three children lived to have children of their own. Most people died before they had turned 45.

Click for extra large pictureEven at the time of the Tollund Man they digged peat in the bog. Extra large pictureMore illustrations.
© Niels BachThe goats needed to be milkedThe goats needed to be milked. Big picture
© Lejre Experimental Centre

The boys and girls had to watch the livestock and help around the house which included fetching firewood for the fireplaces.

The children of the Iron Age played like all children but we don’t know much about the games they played. In a grave which held the body of a young child, Silkeborg Museum discovered a rattle made of clay. Games which made use of dice and a board with glass pieces were also very popular.

We don’t know how much time the children spent on playing. It is very likely that as soon as they were old enough they were put to work – tending the livestock, picking berries, cleaning the stable, spreading manure on the fields and collecting firewood. The day wasn’t divided into work and fun – the two were mixed together.

Girl wearing a dress from the Iron AgeGirl wearing a dress from the Iron Age.
Big picture © Lejre Experimental Centre

People got up when the sun rose and the cock crowed. They probably started the day by feeding the livestock. The manure that had accumulated over night had to be gathered and spread on the fields.

In the wintertime some of the livestock, sheep and pigs would be in the stable right next to where the people ate and slept.

In the summertime most of the residents’ lives were probably spent outdoors. In the evening the livestock would be shooed inside the fence surrounding the village after which it was closed. As the sun was setting people would gather around the fireplace and listen to stories before going to bed. People slept on low plank beds around the fireplace and the sound of the livestock munching would mix with the residents’ snoring.