Where the hell did the Phantom go – Comics, a lost artform?


Were the hell did the Phantom go??? I grew up reading comics and in Sweden they where always sold in ordinary stores (as opose to specialized comic or magazine stores as in the US). The Phantom came already 1950, Donald Duck (in Sweden Donald has always been bigger than Mickey for some reason) and Superman where among those books that would always be around. As a grown up i suddenly realized that they where all gone, a whole artform and part of culture replaced by toy commercials like “Barbie” and “Transformers”.  It used to be the order was: 1:Comic book 2:Movie or TV Series Now it is: 1:Toy or computer game 2:Comic book 3:Movie or TV Series In the 80´s (or so) comics began to be seen as an artform and a way of storytelling in it´s own right. Is that gone again? The problem with a superspeed culture is the lack of a superstrong cloak and we might suddenly find ourselves naked surrounded by things going “bleepedy bleep” but providing nothing beyond the flashy little digits and sounds. Note that i have nothing against computerized games….or toys for that matter. I just like a good story, and some nice pictures now and again.  We need you!

Were the hell did the Phantom go???

I grew up reading comics and in Sweden they where always sold in ordinary stores (as opose to specialized comic or magazine stores as in the US).

The Phantom came already 1950, Donald Duck (in Sweden Donald has always been bigger than Mickey for some reason) and Superman where among those books that would always be around.

As a grown up i suddenly realized that they where all gone, a whole artform and part of culture replaced by toy commercials like “Barbie” and “Transformers”.

Superman

It used to be the order was:

1:Comic book

2:Movie or TV Series

Now it is:

1:Toy or computer game

2:Comic book

3:Movie or TV Series

In the 80´s (or so) comics began to be seen as an artform and a way of storytelling in it´s own right.

Is that gone again?

The problem with a superspeed culture is the lack of a superstrong cloak and we might suddenly find ourselves naked surrounded by things going “bleepedy bleep” but providing nothing beyond the flashy little digits and sounds.

Note that i have nothing against computerized games….or toys for that matter. I just like a good story, and some nice pictures now and again.

Bat Signal

We need you!

 

Stan Lee


@TheRealStanLee One thing that is the storyteller genious of Stan Lee is that he took characters from comics in to YOUR wourld. Paying rent, love, looks,self respect, getting a job, depression…..all of them just as much a part of daily life for the heroes as they are for you. When you get out of the spandex you still got to eat, pass that exam, make him / her see you, stop being such a geek and get that damn wallpaper up. In some cases one could even discuss weather they are heroes in the classical sense (or actually, if you look at the classical Greek heroes like Herakles or Atlas, they are. Flawed is part of the concept). The Punisher or Wolverine, both as*holes with clear psychological problems due to trauma. They are NOT “ta ta ta - the incredible Niceman”.  Fantastic Four, Spider - Man, The Hulk, all iconic all over the world, all the brainchildes of “Stan the man”. As much as we may know about the classic comic book heroes as Superman or Batman, it is still on another level. TV series exepted, how much do we REALLY know about Jonathan and Martha Kent (thank you “Smallville” for expanding.)? Alfred in Batman, he is born in Denmark. What brought him to America? Did he allways want to be a butler?  In Lee´s works the hero´s life is not entirely focused on the hero bit. The stories are built not only around the “Spider” but also around the “Man”, thus making much more multi level drama possable.  When it comes to for instance Mary Jane Parker (fomerly Watson) we not only know that she calls Peter “Tiger”, knew he was Spidey since way back but kept it to herself or that she is a model and aspiering actress but we know how she FEELS about things. She is a character, not just a two dimensional (good looking) stick figure.  Todd Maguire and Kirsten Dunst as Peter and Mary Jane This is the greatness of Stan Lee, that he introduced real drama into comics, on a par with movies or novels. In Sweden, comics has been seen as an art form since at least the early 80´s. Stan has no small part in that He took your everyday problems and mixed them with your inner, nigh mythological self, the hero. Cant you tell your family who you really are for they´re own security (Aunt May-Spider -Man)? Do you just feel so PISSED OFF at the puny humans, but keep it all inside because……they wouldnt like you when you´re angry (The Hulk)? Do you move in angles totally unthinkable to those around you (Spider - Man)? This is the greatness of Marvel, you can identify with the characters in the stories. The players are not mere cliche heroes but the flawed classical heroes of myth and litterature. To my Generalissimo: EXELCIOR!

@TheRealStanLee

One thing that is the storyteller genious of Stan Lee is that he took characters from comics in to YOUR wourld. Paying rent, love, looks,self respect, getting a job, depression…..all of them just as much a part of daily life for the heroes as they are for you.

When you get out of the spandex you still got to eat, pass that exam, make him / her see you, stop being such a geek and get that damn wallpaper up.

In some cases one could even discuss weather they are heroes in the classical sense (or actually, if you look at the classical Greek heroes like Herakles or Atlas, they are. Flawed is part of the concept). The Punisher or Wolverine, both as*holes with clear psychological problems due to trauma. They are NOT “ta ta ta – the incredible Niceman”.

Stan and Peter

Fantastic Four, Spider – Man, The Hulk, all iconic all over the world, all the brainchildes of “Stan the man”.

As much as we may know about the classic comic book heroes as Superman or Batman, it is still on another level.

TV series exepted, how much do we REALLY know about Jonathan and Martha Kent (thank you “Smallville” for expanding.)?

Alfred in Batman, he is born in Denmark. What brought him to America? Did he allways want to be a butler?

Alfred

In Lee´s works the hero´s life is not entirely focused on the hero bit.

The stories are built not only around the “Spider” but also around the “Man”, thus making much more multi level drama possable.

MJ and Peter

When it comes to for instance Mary Jane Parker (fomerly Watson) we not only know that she calls Peter “Tiger”, knew he was Spidey since way back but kept it to herself or that she is a model and aspiering actress but we know how she FEELS about things. She is a character, not just a two dimensional (good looking) stick figure.

Todd and Kirsten

Todd Maguire and Kirsten Dunst as Peter and Mary Jane

This is the greatness of Stan Lee, that he introduced real drama into comics, on a par with movies or novels. In Sweden, comics has been seen as an art form since at least the early 80´s. Stan has no small part in that

He took your everyday problems and mixed them with your inner, nigh mythological self, the hero. Cant you tell your family who you really are for they´re own security (Aunt May-Spider -Man)? Do you just feel so PISSED OFF at the puny humans, but keep it all inside because……they wouldnt like you when you´re angry (The Hulk)? Do you move in angles totally unthinkable to those around you (Spider – Man)?

This is the greatness of Marvel, you can identify with the characters in the stories.

The players are not mere cliche heroes but the flawed classical heroes of myth and litterature.

To my Generalissimo:

EXELCIOR!

 

The Bavarian Illuminati (the real thing, not the silly conspiracy childishness)


  “Princes and nations will disappear without violence from the earth, the human race will become one family and the world the abode of reasonable men. Morality alone will bring about this change imperceptibly.”    — Adam Weishaupt (1748-1830)  The movement was founded on May 1, 1776, in Ingolstadt (Upper Bavaria) as the Order of the Illuminati, with an initial membership of five, by Jesuit-taught Adam Weishaupt (d. 1830), who was the first lay professor of canon law at the University of Ingolstadt. The movement was made up of freethinkers as an offshoot of the Enlightenment, and seems to have been modeled on the Freemasons. Originally Weishaupt had planned the order to be named the “Perfectibilists”. The group has also been called the Bavarian Illuminati and the movement itself has been referred to asIlluminism (after illuminism). In 1777, Karl Theodor became ruler of Bavaria. He was a proponent of Enlightened Despotism and, in 1784, his government banned all secret societies, including the Illuminati. During the period when the Illuminati were legally allowed to operate, many influential intellectuals and progressive politicians counted themselves as members, including Ferdinand of Brunswick and the diplomat Xavier von Zwack, who was number two in the operation and was found with much of the group’s literature when his home was searched. The Illuminati’s members pledged obedience to their superiors. Members were divided into three main classes, each with several degrees. The order had its branches in most countries of the European continent; it reportedly had around 2,000 members over the span of ten years. The organization had its attraction for literary men, such as Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Johann Gottfried Herder, and even for the reigning dukes of Gotha and Weimar. Weishaupt modeled his group to some extent onFreemasonry, and many Illuminati chapters drew membership from existing Masonic lodges. Internal rupture and panic over succession preceded its downfall, which was effected by the Secular Edict made by the Bavarian government in 1785.  Prince Karl Theodor of Bavaria  Adam Weishaupt received an implicit education in secret societies by being a student at a Jesuit college. He largely rejected the explicit Jesuit beliefs, gravitating more toward Enlightenment thinkers who promoted atheism, rationalism, materialism and egalitarianism — such as d’Holbach and Helvetius. As a professor at the Bavarian university of Ingolstadt he must have found the environment somewhat stifling insofar as the main issue of controversy at the time was whether any book by a non-Catholic could be tolerated (books by Enlightenment authors were under absolute ban of censorship). Weishaupt joined the Freemasons in 1774, but quickly became disillusioned and dropped-out. On the first of May, 1776, Weishaupt founded a secret Order of Illuminati (built on the base of a secret student society) consisting of 5 members who were devoted to promoting equality & rationality, primarily through study. By 1779 there were colonies of the Order in five Bavarian cities, the secret library contained much contraband literature and membership numbered 54. Members were all considered Initiates, and they were to be brought slowly to higher grades of knowledge by first reading the classical moralists, and only eventually the rationalists & materialists. Activities of the Order were conducted under assumed names (Weishaupt called himself “Spartacus”) and only the highest Initiates could learn of the Secret Directors (the “Areopagus”) who knew the founder’s identity and the true history & aims of the Order. In 1777 Weishaupt had re-entered the Freemasons in hopes of gaining useful lore for his own Order — and in hopes of tapping-off new members. Whether by original design or evolved purpose, the idea was conceived to for Illuminati members to penetrate the highest Masonic grades to take control of the Lodges. In this way, Masons receptive to Illuminati ideas could be initiated into the highest Orders and less receptive members left to the lower Orders — and subjected to more dilute truths & convenient fabrications. In 1779 the Masonic Lodge in Munich succumbed to the Illuminati, and this branch was given authority by the English-authorized Frankfurt Lodge to set-up daughter Lodges, which it did. By mid-1782 the Order numbered about 300 men, said to have included Goethe & Mozart (I doubt this since Mozart was a devout Catholic his whole life). In 1783 it spread to Bohemia & Milan, and then to Hungary. In 1784 one of the highest Initiates defected and made public some sensationalistic stories of his experiences. When the Bavarian Elector published an Edict forbidding secret societies, Weishaupt went to him in naive innocence and explained his secrets. As a consequence the Elector issued a new Edict explicitly condemning Freemasons and Illuminati on religious, social and political grounds. Weishaupt fled and the Illuminati vaporized. Considering the spectacularly anti-religious character of Weishaupt’s ideas & ambitions, it is not surprising that in 1797 a Jesuit, Augustin de Barruel, should make history with a book asserting that the French Revolution was the product of a carefully planned plot — and that behind the Jacobins were the Philosophes, the Freemasons and (above all) the Illuminati. Later, the British authoress Nesta Webster in World Revolution, the Plot Against Civilization (London, 1921) attributed every revolutionary upheaval from 1789 to the Illuminati — and she considered Bolshevism & Zionism to spring from the same source.

“Princes and nations will disappear without violence from the earth, the human race will become one family and the world the abode of reasonable men. Morality alone will bring about this change imperceptibly.”

— Adam Weishaupt (1748-1830)
Illumini

The movement was founded on May 1, 1776, in Ingolstadt (Upper Bavaria) as the Order of the Illuminati, with an initial membership of five, by Jesuit-taught Adam Weishaupt (d. 1830), who was the first lay professor of canon law at the University of Ingolstadt. The movement was made up of freethinkers as an offshoot of the Enlightenment, and seems to have been modeled on the Freemasons.

Originally Weishaupt had planned the order to be named the “Perfectibilists”. The group has also been called the Bavarian Illuminati and the movement itself has been referred to asIlluminism (after illuminism). In 1777, Karl Theodor became ruler of Bavaria. He was a proponent of Enlightened Despotism and, in 1784, his government banned all secret societies, including the Illuminati.

During the period when the Illuminati were legally allowed to operate, many influential intellectuals and progressive politicians counted themselves as members, including Ferdinand of Brunswick and the diplomat Xavier von Zwack, who was number two in the operation and was found with much of the group’s literature when his home was searched. The Illuminati’s members pledged obedience to their superiors. Members were divided into three main classes, each with several degrees.

The order had its branches in most countries of the European continent; it reportedly had around 2,000 members over the span of ten years. The organization had its attraction for literary men, such as Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Johann Gottfried Herder, and even for the reigning dukes of Gotha and Weimar. Weishaupt modeled his group to some extent onFreemasonry, and many Illuminati chapters drew membership from existing Masonic lodges. Internal rupture and panic over succession preceded its downfall, which was effected by the Secular Edict made by the Bavarian government in 1785.

KToB

Prince Karl Theodor of Bavaria

Adam Weishaupt received an implicit education in secret societies by being a student at a Jesuit college. He largely rejected the explicit Jesuit beliefs, gravitating more toward Enlightenment thinkers who promoted atheism, rationalism, materialism and egalitarianism — such as d’Holbach and Helvetius. As a professor at the Bavarian university of Ingolstadt he must have found the environment somewhat stifling insofar as the main issue of controversy at the time was whether any book by a non-Catholic could be tolerated (books by Enlightenment authors were under absolute ban of censorship).

Weishaupt joined the Freemasons in 1774, but quickly became disillusioned and dropped-out. On the first of May, 1776, Weishaupt founded a secret Order of Illuminati (built on the base of a secret student society) consisting of 5 members who were devoted to promoting equality & rationality, primarily through study. By 1779 there were colonies of the Order in five Bavarian cities, the secret library contained much contraband literature and membership numbered 54. Members were all considered Initiates, and they were to be brought slowly to higher grades of knowledge by first reading the classical moralists, and only eventually the rationalists & materialists. Activities of the Order were conducted under assumed names (Weishaupt called himself “Spartacus”) and only the highest Initiates could learn of the Secret Directors (the “Areopagus”) who knew the founder’s identity and the true history & aims of the Order.

In 1777 Weishaupt had re-entered the Freemasons in hopes of gaining useful lore for his own Order — and in hopes of tapping-off new members. Whether by original design or evolved purpose, the idea was conceived to for Illuminati members to penetrate the highest Masonic grades to take control of the Lodges. In this way, Masons receptive to Illuminati ideas could be initiated into the highest Orders and less receptive members left to the lower Orders — and subjected to more dilute truths & convenient fabrications.

In 1779 the Masonic Lodge in Munich succumbed to the Illuminati, and this branch was given authority by the English-authorized Frankfurt Lodge to set-up daughter Lodges, which it did. By mid-1782 the Order numbered about 300 men, said to have included Goethe & Mozart (I doubt this since Mozart was a devout Catholic his whole life). In 1783 it spread to Bohemia & Milan, and then to Hungary.

In 1784 one of the highest Initiates defected and made public some sensationalistic stories of his experiences. When the Bavarian Elector published an Edict forbidding secret societies, Weishaupt went to him in naive innocence and explained his secrets. As a consequence the Elector issued a new Edict explicitly condemning Freemasons and Illuminati on religious, social and political grounds. Weishaupt fled and the Illuminati vaporized.

Considering the spectacularly anti-religious character of Weishaupt’s ideas & ambitions, it is not surprising that in 1797 a Jesuit, Augustin de Barruel, should make history with a book asserting that the French Revolution was the product of a carefully planned plot — and that behind the Jacobins were the Philosophes, the Freemasons and (above all) the Illuminati. Later, the British authoress Nesta Webster in World Revolution, the Plot Against Civilization (London, 1921) attributed every revolutionary upheaval from 1789 to the Illuminati — and she considered Bolshevism & Zionism to spring from the same source.