logical fallacy


 

http://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/

 

A logical fallacy is usually what has happened when someone is wrong about something. It’s a flaw in reasoning. They’re like tricks or illusions of thought, and they’re often very sneakily used by politicians and the media to fool people.

Don’t be fooled! This website and poster have been designed to help you identify and call out dodgy logic wherever it may raise its ugly, incoherent head.

 

in all honesty, we probably all use flawed logic from time to time.

 

 

Some fucking introspection?


As soon as something as horrible as the Oslo bombing and Utöya shooting happens, it is like everybody starts surfing it to further their pet ideologies.

People saying things like “vote right wing parties with nationalistic ideas out” (the feeling of being “silenced” is exactly one of the things that creates McVeighs and Breiviks).

Nationalists will ofcourse claim that the purp was feeling desperate and cornered and felt he had no other option, but that they cant condone his actions (exactly the same argument as Islamist terrorists would use).

I for one emidiatly thought “Islam”.
The fact that i have lived in a country where terrorists where red headed and military was patrolling the streets at bank deliveries (i almost shat myself. If i would have sneezed i would be full of holes now) didnt make a difference.

The fact that i´m aware of Japanese terrorists that where neither Muslims nor Christians didnt make a difference either.

Grant it, Islamic terrorism is over represented in the world FOR NOW.

So here we are, looking at each other.
Seeking that scape goat.

Furthering our ideolical agendas.

PEOPLE ARE DEAD, FOR REAL,AS IN ” DO NO LONGER EXIST”!

Maybe we should be looking at ouselves?
Maybe some fucking introspection?

Pompeo Batoni – Colonel the Hon. William Gordon, 1765


Pompeo Batoni – Colonel the Hon. William Gordon, 1765

It’s XVIII century fashion plus Scottish pride. Oh, yeah.

A Gordon,a Gordon, a Gordon BYDAND!

(Ps.Bydand = Scots for “Abide”, motto / warcry of Clan Gordon)

Artist Batoni, Pompeo (Italian painter and draftsman, 1708-1787)
Title Colonel the Hon. William Gordon of Fyvie
Alternative/previous titles Colonel the Hon. William Gordon; Colonel William Gordon; Gen. the Hon. John William Gordon.
Date 1766 (dated)
Material oil on canvas
Measurements 258.2 x 186.1 cm
Inscription front ll ‘POMPEJUS BATONI PINXIT/ ROMAE ANNO 1766’, front lr ‘Gen.l The Hon.ble John William Gordon’.
Description William Gordon (1736-1816) is depicted in Rome during his Grand Tour. Although he wears the uniform of the Queen’s Own Royal Highlanders, his tartan has been arranged to look like a stylised Roman toga.While typical of Batoni’s portraits in its general confidence and swagger, this image particularly captures the ideals of the grand tourist abroad. Gordon stands in front of the Colosseum and next to a statue depicting the personification of Rome. During his visit to Rome, James Boswell saw Batoni working on the portrait on 17 April 1765, writing, ‘Yesterday morning saw Batoni draw Gord. Drapery’.
Subject portrait (Gordon, Colonel the Hon. William); townscape; military and war; place (Rome)
Collection National Trust for Scotland (Fyvie Castle)

1920´s Fashion Trends


  By the end of  the First World War, many changes in fashion came about. Short bobs became in,  as well as pinafores worn above the knee. Corsets were gone, and women suddenly  dressed like boys. The androgynous style soon became the in thing by 1925.  Sportswear became hot trends among men and women, with popular designers Jean  Patou with Coco Chanel helping popularize the athletic look.Chanel was  one of the most popular fashion movers of the era, as she was responsible for  introducing chic and futuristic designs. She helped in making popular the bob  hairstyle, use of jersey knit among women, as well as use of the little black  dress. She also made popular the use of jewelry and knitwear among her  clients.Another popular French designer of the era was Jeanne Lanvin,  who was responsible for introducing intricate trimmings, as well as impressive  embroideries and decorations. By the middle of the decade she had manufactured  an impressive line of products ranging from men’s wear, sportswear, and  lingerie.Still another renowned designer of the decade was Jean Patou.  While hers was never mainstream, Patou’s style was eccentric and original. She  was known for her garments with clean lines, emphasized by luxury and  practicality.Men’s wear became emphasized youthfulness and relaxation.  Formality was being forgotten, as men preferred to show off their youthfulness.  They wore short suit jackets, as well as short tuxedo, sweaters and short pants.  Another trend was the London cut, made popular by the English tailor  Scholte.  The cloche hat  is a fitted, bell-shaped hat that was popular during the 1920s.(Cloche is the  French word for bell.) Caroline Reboux is the creator of the cloche  hat.Cloche hats were usually made of felt so that they conformed to the  head. The hat was typically designed to be worn low on the forehead, with the  wearer’s eyes only slightly below the brim. By 1928-1929, it became fashionable  to turn the brims on cloche hats upwards. This style remained prevalent  throughout the early 1930’s until the cloche hat became obsolete around  1933-1934.Often, different styles of ribbons affixed to the hats  indicated different messages about the wearer. Several popular messages included  An arrow-like ribbon which indicated a girl was single but had already given her  heart to someone, a firm knot which signaled marriage or a flamboyant bow which  indicated the wearer was single and interested in mingling.Cloche hats’  popularity and influence were overwhelming. Couture houses like Lanvin and  Molyneux opened ateliers to join milliners in manufacturing the hats. The hats  even shaped hairstyles the Eton crop (the short, slicked-down cut worn by  Josephine Baker) became popular because it was ideal to showcase the hats’  shape.

1930s fashion

By the end of the First World War, many changes in fashion came about. Short bobs became in, as well as pinafores worn above the knee. Corsets were gone, and women suddenly dressed like boys. The androgynous style soon became the in thing by 1925. Sportswear became hot trends among men and women, with popular designers Jean Patou with Coco Chanel helping popularize the athletic look.

Chanel was one of the most popular fashion movers of the era, as she was responsible for introducing chic and futuristic designs. She helped in making popular the bob hairstyle, use of jersey knit among women, as well as use of the little black dress. She also made popular the use of jewelry and knitwear among her clients.

Another popular French designer of the era was Jeanne Lanvin, who was responsible for introducing intricate trimmings, as well as impressive embroideries and decorations. By the middle of the decade she had manufactured an impressive line of products ranging from men’s wear, sportswear, and lingerie.

Still another renowned designer of the decade was Jean Patou. While hers was never mainstream, Patou’s style was eccentric and original. She was known for her garments with clean lines, emphasized by luxury and practicality.

Men’s wear became emphasized youthfulness and relaxation. Formality was being forgotten, as men preferred to show off their youthfulness. They wore short suit jackets, as well as short tuxedo, sweaters and short pants. Another trend was the London cut, made popular by the English tailor Scholte.

The cloche hat

The cloche hat is a fitted, bell-shaped hat that was popular during the 1920s.(Cloche is the French word for bell.) Caroline Reboux is the creator of the cloche hat.

Cloche hats were usually made of felt so that they conformed to the head. The hat was typically designed to be worn low on the forehead, with the wearer’s eyes only slightly below the brim. By 1928-1929, it became fashionable to turn the brims on cloche hats upwards. This style remained prevalent throughout the early 1930’s until the cloche hat became obsolete around 1933-1934.

Often, different styles of ribbons affixed to the hats indicated different messages about the wearer. Several popular messages included An arrow-like ribbon which indicated a girl was single but had already given her heart to someone, a firm knot which signaled marriage or a flamboyant bow which indicated the wearer was single and interested in mingling.

Cloche hats’ popularity and influence were overwhelming. Couture houses like Lanvin and Molyneux opened ateliers to join milliners in manufacturing the hats. The hats even shaped hairstyles the Eton crop (the short, slicked-down cut worn by Josephine Baker) became popular because it was ideal to showcase the hats’ shape.