Could Magicians Praying Have Over Sensetive Invocation Trigger Fingers?


Sounds like i´m kidding, i´m aware of that.

However it is something i have pondered as i am also religous and have a more “fit into everyday activities” spirituality.

Whats your problem dude?

Those who sing might have noticed how you sometimes just “silly sing” or hum and it sounds quite good for a guy with a toothbrush in his mouth.

One might think “Not bad for not using any technique” before realizing that one is actually using technique.

It has just gotten habit and is more in the back of the head (and very downplayed obviously).

Sometimes while and after praying i have experienced a feeling not unlike the one after an invication.

That feeling of being energized in a way that is not “general” but specific (i am a polytheist so we might even talk different Deities here giving it even more of a span). This feeling of “thickness” or charge in the air and the body.

Emotions running a bit wild, ideas running through the head (though less so than after an invocative ritual).

You know that feeling, when you know you need to banish. When it would be obvious to perform an LBRP if you where mid magical or Yogic practices.

Ofcourse ordinary exoteric religion doesent normally require any banishing type activity (when did you hear a praying Christian end with “Ok God, thanks, i will now purify the area from exess prayer mojo”).

Pondering

Could it be that someone who has practiced Ceremonial Magic…k…ue…for years, a few decades or so, might be so “used” to certain states, visualizasions and so on that practically anything that feels “spiritual” or “ritualistic” might trigger an internal “behaviour”. A number of effects accessing Yesod (or the supernals as Neschamah depending on if you internalize the Etz Chaii)?

If so that would mean that an LBRP might be a good idea even if all you have been doing is praying or being very devout in practices who normally wouldnt require it.

In my case i often have periods where either Ceremonial/Yogic/Alchemical work is done in a very concentrated way OR prayer/ devotion and sacrificial life is in focus.

I dont blend the Thelemic part and the Heathen part (in praxis).

Maybe this is part of what Crowley meant by it being impossible to leave magick once you entered (exept for the magickal vow part).

“Healing” and Healing!!!


Maybe i´m not really that pissed that i´m still coughing my lungs up.

I´ve been sick before.

Sooner or later germs tend to get the hell away, deciding i´m to icky for them.

Maybe the answer from Eir and other Gods would give me sense of order.

Order in the universe and a sense of control.

A mere cough would be a shitty thing to complain about.

My human tribe being greatly diminished perhaps the Divine and Ancestral part of the tribe is what keeps me together, makes me belong.

Gives me a place.

Religion as a Christian concept


 Religion as a Christian concept The social constructionists In recent years, some academic writers have described religion according to the theory of social constructionism, which considers how ideas and social phenomena develop in a social context. Among the main proponents of this theory of religion are Timothy Fitzgerald, Daniel Dubuisson and Talad Assad. The social constructionists argue that religion is a modern concept that developed from Christianity and was then applied inappropriately to non-Western cultures and European pre Christian cultures.

The social constructionists

In recent years, some academic writers have described religion according to the theory of social constructionism, which considers how ideas and social phenomena develop in a social context. Among the main proponents of this theory of religion are Timothy Fitzgerald, Daniel Dubuisson and Talad Assad. The social constructionists argue that religion is a modern concept that developed from Christianity and was then applied inappropriately to non-Western cultures and European pre Christian cultures.

Similar views to social constructionism have been put forward by writers who are not social constructionists. George Lindbeck, a Lutheran and a postliberal theologian, says that religion does not refer to belief in “God” or a transcendent Absolute, but rather to “a kind of cultural and/or linguistic framework or medium that shapes the entirety of life and thought … it is similar to an idiom that makes possible the description of realities, the formulation of beliefs, and the experiencing of inner attitudes, feelings, and sentiments.” Nicholas de Lange, Professor of Hebrew and Jewish Studies at Cambridge University, says that “The comparative study of religions is an academic discipline which has been developed within Christian theology faculties, and it has a tendency to force widely differing phenomena into a kind of strait-jacket cut to a Christian pattern. The problem is not only that other ‘religions’ may have little or nothing to say about questions which are of burning importance for Christianity, but that they may not even see themselves as religions in precisely the same way in which Christianity sees itself as a religion.”

Similar views to social constructionism have been put forward by writers who are not social constructionists. George Lindbeck, a Lutheran and a postliberal theologian, says that religion does not refer to belief in “God” or a transcendent Absolute, but rather to “a kind of cultural and/or linguistic framework or medium that shapes the entirety of life and thought … it is similar to an idiom that makes possible the description of realities, the formulation of beliefs, and the experiencing of inner attitudes, feelings, and sentiments.” Nicholas de Lange, Professor of Hebrew and Jewish Studies at Cambridge University, says that “The comparative study of religions is an academic discipline which has been developed within Christian theology faculties, and it has a tendency to force widely differing phenomena into a kind of strait-jacket cut to a Christian pattern. The problem is not only that other ‘religions’ may have little or nothing to say about questions which are of burning importance for Christianity, but that they may not even see themselves as religions in precisely the same way in which Christianity sees itself as a religion.”