Summer Blot 2010


Some photos taken during midsummer blot / my birthday last year in the small community of Asa (yup, thats its name) in the province of Småland, Sweden.My primary Blot during the day.

The Prayer

A small bronze age grave mound (called a Tumulus) incorrectly often referred to as "The grave of Odin".

Blot by the mound.All things considered i bloted to the ancestors too despite it not being Alfa Blot.

 

List of reconstructionist polytheistic pagan religions


Polytheistic reconstructionism (Reconstructionism) is an approach to Neopaganism first emerging in the late 1960s to early 1970s, and gathering momentum in the 1990s to 2000s. Reconstructionism attempts to re-establish historical polytheistic religions in the modern world, in contrast with syncretic movements like Wicca, and “channeled” movements like Germanic mysticism or Theosophy.

Many practitioners of folk religions live outside of the original cultures and territories from which those historical religions arose, and reconstructonists consequently face the problem of understanding, and then implementing, the worldview of pre-modern rural societies in a modern, possibly urban environment.

1.

  1. There is no attempt to recreate a combined pan-European paganism.
  2. Researchers attempt to stay within research guidelines developed over the course of the past century for handling documentation generated in the time periods that they are studying.
  3. A multi-disciplinary approach is utilized capitalizing on results from various fields as historical literary research, anthropology, religious history, political history, archeology, forensic anthropology, historical sociology, etc. with an overt attempt to avoid pseudo-sciences.
  4. There are serious attempts to recreate culture, politics, science and art of the period in order to better understand the environment within which the religious beliefs were practiced

Celtic shrine

Asatru – Norse  (Please keep in mind that some practices of Asatru differ between Scandinavia and America, partly since the custom never really left here butb stayed in traditions, folklore, placenames and so on. The actual FAITH is the same though).

http://www.asatru.ca/?page_id=3

Hellenismos – Greek

http://hellenismos.us/b/

Religio Romana – Roman

http://www.novaroma.org/religio_romana/

Anglo – Saxon Heathenry – Anglo – Saxon

http://www.englatheod.org/anglosaxon.htm

Celtic Revivalism – Celtic

http://redbranchsociety.wikidot.com/celtic-revivalism

Natib Qadish – Caanaanite

http://canaanitepath.com/introduction.htm

Romuva – Lithuanian

http://www.romuva.lt/en.html

Finnish Paganism – Finland

http://www.taivaannaula.org/finnish_paganism.php

Estonian Paganism – Estonia

http://mysticwicks.com/showthread.php?t=162063

Kemeticism – Egyptian

http://www.inkemetic.org/Library/kemeticism.htm

Slavic Paganism

http://www.circe-argent.com/slavic_paganism.htm

Romuva

These are only a few (the biggest) reconstructive religions out there, and dont forget that using terms like “Germanic, Celtic” or “Slavic” are simplifications.

There whyere several tribes of each of these larger ethnic groups and  time and geography would mean variations. Even within what is now Sweden there where differences in cult.

The biggest reconstructive polytheistic religion last i checked was Asatru.

Members of YSEE, a Hellenic Reconstructionist group, perform a ritual.

Hellenists

There are about a 100 000 Hellenists in Greece, a country that only recently gained religious freedom (ie it was forbidden to be a Hellenist) and a whole lot in the US

 

Blot


The blót (Old Norse neuter) refers to Norse pagan sacrifice to the Norse gods and the spirits of the land. The sacrifice often took the form of a sacramental meal or feast. Related religious practices were performed by other Germanic peoples, such as the pagan Anglo-Saxons. The blót element of horse sacrifice is found throughout Indo-European traditions, including the Vedic Indian, Celtic, and Latin traditions.  The verb blóta meant “to worship with sacrifice”,[3] or “to strengthen”.[4] The sacrifice usually consisted of animals, in particular pigs and horses. The meat was boiled in large cooking pits with heated stones, either indoors or outdoors. The blood was considered to contain special powers and it was sprinkled on the statues of the gods, on the walls and on the participants themselves. It was a sacred moment when the people gathered around the steaming cauldrons to have a meal together with the gods or the Elves. The drink that was passed around was blessed and sacred as well and it was passed from participant to participant. The drink was usually beer or mead but among the nobility it could be imported wine. The old prayer was til árs ok friðar, “for a good year and frith (peace)” They asked for fertility, good health, a good life and peace and harmony between the people and the powers.  Modern adherents of the reconstructionist religions Theodism and Ásatrú continue to practice the ritual of blót, which is one of the most important ritual observances of their religion, in addition to symbel.

The blót (Old Norse neuter) refers to Norse pagan sacrifice to the Norse gods and the spirits of the land. The sacrifice often took the form of a sacramental meal or feast. Related religious practices were performed by other Germanic peoples, such as the pagan Anglo-Saxons. The blót element of horse sacrifice is found throughout Indo-European traditions, including the Vedic IndianCeltic, and Latin traditions.

 

The verb blóta meant “to worship with sacrifice”, or “to strengthen”. The sacrifice usually consisted of animals, in particular pigs and horses. The meat was boiled in large cooking pits with heated stones, either indoors or outdoors. The blood was considered to contain special powers and it was sprinkled on the statues of the gods, on the walls and on the participants themselves.

It was a sacred moment when the people gathered around the steaming cauldrons to have a meal together with the gods or the Elves. The drink that was passed around was blessed and sacred as well and it was passed from participant to participant. The drink was usually beer or mead but among the nobility it could be imported wine.

 Sacrifice (via Old French from Latin sacrificium, from sacra ”sacred rites” + facere, “to do, perform”) is the religious practice of offering food, objects (typically valuables), or the lives of animals or people to the gods as an act of propitiation or worship. While sacrifice often implies ritual killing, the term offering (Latin oblatio) can be used for bloodless sacrifices of cereal food or artefacts. For offerings of liquids (beverages) by pouring, the term libation is used.  In modern Heathen /  Pagan religions like Wicca and Neo Druidry animals are NEVER sacrificed, EVER. Both in modern and historical religions Oblatio and Libation has been the most common (and human sacrifice the least common). Livestock would have been expencive and sacrificed at the bigger celebrations. Human sacrifice was mostly common in times of dire danger and panic.  Among Polytheistic reconstructionism animal sacrifice is a matter of debate but many are for it IF it is performed by a butcher, hunter, farmer or anyone else with a PROFFESSION including slaughter. It should be said too that both in historical times, and now, the meat is eaten (as opposed to popular belief). Generally only the blood, fat or something similar (or maybe portions of the meat) is set aside for the Gods. Sacrifice is not meant to leave you without.   The practice of sacrifice is seen in the oldest records. The archaeological record contains human and animal corpses with sacrificial marks long before any written records of the practice. Sacrifices are a common theme in most religions, though the frequency of animal, and especially human, sacrifices are rare today. Literally anything of some value may be a sacrifice in some religion’s practices. The more valuable the offering, generally, the more highly the sacrifice is regarded but the more difficult to make. On a day-to-day basis, offerings may be quite simple indeed: flowers, candles, incense, spilling some of the drink from a cup before drinking. Commonly, the most valuable sacrifices have been that of lives, animal or human.  The Latin term came to be used of the Christian eucharist in particular, sometimes dubbed a “bloodless sacrifice” to distinguish it from pagan practices of “blood sacrifice”. In individual pre-Christian ethnic religions, terms translated as “sacrifice” include the Indic yajna, the Greek thusia , the Germanic blōtan, the Semitic qorban/qurban, etc. The term is also used metaphorically to describe selfless good deeds for others or a short term loss in return for a greater gain, such as in a game of chess. Recently it has also come into use as meaning ‘doing without something’ or ‘giving something up’ (see also self-sacrifice)

The old prayer was til árs ok friðar, “for a good year and frith (peace)” They asked for fertility, good health, a good life and peace and harmony between the people and the powers.

Modern adherents of the reconstructionist religions Theodism and Ásatrú continue to practice the ritual of blót, which is one of the most important ritual observances of their religion, in addition to symbel.