Vintage


i havent put much on this blog under the category “vintage” since that would be pretty much the whole blog.

i kind of wonder if i should´nt have though, to attract the “right” crowd (or rather their attention).

more or less everything on the blog ranges from the 1700´s to 1980´s and includes highland wear, punk, flappers, swing, victorian and edwardian clothes.

http://thebeautifultimes.wordpress.com/

http://thebeautifultimes.wordpress.com/

http://thebeautifultimes.wordpress.com/

TC

An Oxymoron’s Dream: The Black Skin Head


Actually not so much of an oxymoron.
Raised in Jamaica, Queens of NYC, McDaniel felt the same way many Blacks in alt-culture had about their neighborhoods, out of place. His community saturated with mainstream hip hop, gangs, drugs and ghetto mentality, McDaniel did not want to follow what surrounded him and ensnaring the other youths in his neighborhood. He did indeed listen to some hip hop of the time such as Biggie Smalls and Nas but not much. He expressed, “In my community, people tried to be thugs at 10, 14, 15.” McDaniel saw the dead-end aspect that affected his hood and where it stemmed from.
Besides hip hop, McDaniel was exposed to genres for his mother listed to smooth jazz and classics. However, he found his heart in the aggressiveness of punk.
It was a London friend that over in Howard Beach, Queens that introduced him to punk. McDaniel hung out in the Italian dominated neighborhood learning how to skateboard in his early teens.

Around thirteen or fourteen years old, McDaniel grew deeper into punk and so did his look. Black Flag “My War” was his anthem but he was a Black kid in a private Catholic school. Embracing the DIY nature of punk, McDaniel would modify his school uniform and wear a trench coat with combat boots, mimicking his punk friend but the worlds they lived in were very different for he was Black and the friend was White. As expected in any Black alt-circles, McDaniel caught plenty of criticism from the Black community and became an outcast outside the monolith.
McDaniel was about eighteen or nineteen and attending a show he had seen a group of English guys who covered in tattoos but very clean cut and well respected in the club. No one ran into them or disrespected them; they looked like nerds who could rough up anyone. They held McDaniel’s eye but he never went up to speak to any of them…until he saw one walking down the street one day. 
Enchanted by the straight edge and clean cut look, McDaniel had approached the man and asked him about his look. The clean-cut looking man replied, “I’m a skinhead” and McDaniel was taken aback. He thought the same thing everyone else did about skinheads: that they were racist and Nazis. Perplexed, McDaniel did some research and listened to a song the clean-cut skinhead had given him titled “Skinhead Moonstomp,” which was a mixture of ska and reggae. McDaniel described being astounded by the beats of the music and decided to dig deeper again.

The first Black skinhead McDaniel met was walking down the street with yellow laces in his boots, in his 40’s and an NYC old guard punk from the ‘80’s. His name was Joe. McDaniel stuck to him strongly and Joe became his mentor. He had straightened up Mc Daniel’s look, which was sorely needed at the time, and gave McDaniel a special piece of advice: “When you see a Black in the alt scene, talk to them. If they’re a freak, make them your friend. Don’t shun them.” It is also from Joe had McDaniel learn about S.H.A.R.P. – Skinheads Against Racial Prejudice – and the NYC chapter although plenty of the original members had dispersed. Joe taught McDaniel the dress code of a Sharp: White laces were for nazi, red laces meant communist, the American flag was always on the right arm, the pins were always precise and the Sharp should always look sharp, never show a sloppy appearance, to name a few. 

Actually not so much of an oxymoron.

Source: Afro – Punk http://www.afropunk.com/profiles/blogs/an-oxymorons-dream-the-black

Raised in Jamaica, Queens of NYC, McDaniel felt the same way many Blacks in alt-culture had about their neighborhoods, out of place. His community saturated with mainstream hip hop, gangs, drugs and ghetto mentality, McDaniel did not want to follow what surrounded him and ensnaring the other youths in his neighborhood. He did indeed listen to some hip hop of the time such as Biggie Smalls and Nas but not much. He expressed, “In my community, people tried to be thugs at 10, 14, 15.” McDaniel saw the dead-end aspect that affected his hood and where it stemmed from.

Besides hip hop, McDaniel was exposed to genres for his mother listed to smooth jazz and classics. However, he found his heart in the aggressiveness of punk.

It was a London friend that over in Howard Beach, Queens that introduced him to punk. McDaniel hung out in the Italian dominated neighborhood learning how to skateboard in his early teens.

Black Flag

Around thirteen or fourteen years old, McDaniel grew deeper into punk and so did his look. Black Flag “My War” was his anthem but he was a Black kid in a private Catholic school. Embracing the DIY nature of punk, McDaniel would modify his school uniform and wear a trench coat with combat boots, mimicking his punk friend but the worlds they lived in were very different for he was Black and the friend was White. As expected in any Black alt-circles, McDaniel caught plenty of criticism from the Black community and became an outcast outside the monolith.

McDaniel was about eighteen or nineteen and attending a show he had seen a group of English guys who covered in tattoos but very clean cut and well respected in the club. No one ran into them or disrespected them; they looked like nerds who could rough up anyone. They held McDaniel’s eye but he never went up to speak to any of them…until he saw one walking down the street one day.

DM

Enchanted by the straight edge and clean cut look, McDaniel had approached the man and asked him about his look. The clean-cut looking man replied, “I’m a skinhead” and McDaniel was taken aback. He thought the same thing everyone else did about skinheads: that they were racist and Nazis. Perplexed, McDaniel did some research and listened to a song the clean-cut skinhead had given him titled “Skinhead Moonstomp,” which was a mixture of ska and reggae. McDaniel described being astounded by the beats of the music and decided to dig deeper again.

SHARP

The first Black skinhead McDaniel met was walking down the street with yellow laces in his boots, in his 40’s and an NYC old guard punk from the ‘80’s. His name was Joe. McDaniel stuck to him strongly and Joe became his mentor. He had straightened up Mc Daniel’s look, which was sorely needed at the time, and gave McDaniel a special piece of advice: “When you see a Black in the alt scene, talk to them. If they’re a freak, make them your friend. Don’t shun them.” It is also from Joe had McDaniel learn about S.H.A.R.P. –Skinheads Against Racial Prejudice – and the NYC chapter although plenty of the original members had dispersed. Joe taught McDaniel the dress code of a Sharp: White laces were for nazi, red laces meant communist, the American flag was always on the right arm, the pins were always precise and the Sharp should always look sharp, never show a sloppy appearance, to name a few.

Skinhead Reggae – For The Vinyle Junkie


Skinhead is of purely British origin, it was not until well into it’s existence that it was recognized as such by the Jamaican music industry, and then became part of a feed-back loop connecting the British Isle’s to Jamaica. What is Skinhead in a Jamaican music context? In truth it could be said that almost all music, known collectively as Reggae, from the late 1960s until about c1972 could be claimed as Skinhead, because Reggae was the Skinheads music of choice, they identified with its content and form and adopted it with pride.

Bootboys or early skinheads

As with all styles and movements the story reaches back into its pre-existence. Three defining characteristics of a Skinhead, the mode of dress, the type, or class, of person, and the music, had all existed before the Skinhead had been codified. The most defining characteristic of the Skinhead is, of course, their appearance, and the hair in particular. As is well known many of the very first Skins were at one time Mods who were, for numerous reasons, many to do with fashion, disinclined to dress and behave in the evolving style and attitudes of the Hippie, a predominantly American (West Coast) middle class situation. The haircut and all of the clothes that became standard dress for the (male) Skinhead were worn previously, at one time or another, by Mods. This is not to take anything away from the style of the Skinhead, it just reinforces their commitment to some of the class values inherent in the Mod movement.

Only when Skinhead’s had asserted their existence were they able to claim the preceding (Jamaican) music as their own. This was partly because it had shared these same characteristics, and had inadvertently helped to define the Skinhead. The early Jamaican music that the Skin’s identified mostly with, were cuts like: Derrick Morgan’s Fat Man, and Eric Morris’s Humpty Dumpty, both on the Blue Beat label, and: Forward March Derrick Morgan, Miss Jamaica by Jimmy Cliff and Housewife’s Choice Derrick & Patsy, all on the Island label, it was these, and others in a similar strident or assertive vein, from the pre Ska period that would have later become part of the lexicon of Skinhead Reggae. Yet it was with Ska and the first mention of ‘Rude Boys’ that the embryonic Skinhead had matured into a recognizable entity.

Ska special…from Jamaica to the U.K.

a tribute to the ska scene in images; soundtrack featuring Derrick Morgan-Forward March, Count Ossie’s Grounation-Cool Breeze, Derrick Morgan-The Hop, Don Drummond-Man In The Street, Prince Buster-Don’t Throw Stones and The Skatalites-Guns Of Navarone.

Tartan in sub cultures


TARTAN TROUSERS

The designs are current but a reflection on the past ‘skinhead’ subculture stlye which give it a retro look. The trousers are made from tartan.

Black Tartan Clan. Celtic Punk

Fred Perry MaacQueen Tartan Shirt.

This shirt would actually fit Skinheads,Punks or Rockabillies equally well.

Punk RED Tartan/Plaid...Punk RED Tartan/Plaid…

eBay: Find Punk RED Tartan/Plaid cigarette PANTS THERMAL LEGGING…

 First Added by neverhood

Punk Tartan/Plaid...

I have been known to wear something similar, though mine had a black and white tartan and was originally equipped with a “kilt”.

I always used to wear a pairl like these, though black and white tartan.